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Wikimania 2007 Taipei :: a Globe in Accord
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What Open Source and Wiki Communities Can Teach Businesses About Innovation and Collaboration?

Author Brian Behlendorf
Track Technical Infrastructure
License Heckert GNU.png GNU Free Documentation License (details)
About the author
Brian Behlendorf (Born March 30, 1973) is an technologist, computer programmer, and an important figure in the open-source software movement. He was a primary developer of the Apache Web server, the most popular web server software on the Internet, and a founding member of the Apache Group, which later became the Apache Software Foundation. Behlendorf served as President of the Foundation for three years.

Behlendorf, raised in Southern California, became interested in the early development of the Internet while he was a student at the University of California, Berkeley in the early 1990s. One of his first projects was an electronic mailing list and online music resource, SFRaves, which a friend persuaded him to start in 1992. Behlendorf was an early participant and the chief technology guru for the Burning Man festival, and also founded Hyperreal, a large online resource devoted to electronic music and related subcultures. In 1993, Behlendorf, Jonathan Nelson, Matthew Nelson and Cliff Skolnick co-founded Organic, Inc., the first business dedicated to building commercial web sites. While developing the first online, for-profit, media project — the HotWired web site for Wired Magazine — in 1994, they realized that the most commonly used web server software at the time (developed at the National Center for Supercomputing Applications at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign) could not handle the user registration system that the company required. So, Behlendorf patched the open-source code to support HotWired's requirements.

It turned out that Behlendorf wasn't the only one busy patching the NCSA code at the time, so he and Cliff Skolnick put together an electronic mailing list to coordinate the work of the other programmers. By the end of February 1995, eight core contributors to the project started Apache as a "fork" of the NCSA codebase. Working loosely together, they eventually rewrote the entire original program as the Apache HTTP Server. In 1999, the project incorporated as the Apache Software Foundation. Behlendorf is now the Chief Technology Officer at CollabNet, a company he co-founded with O'Reilly & Associates (now O'Reilly Media) in 1999 to develop tools for enabling collaborative, distributed software development. CollabNet is also the primary corporate sponsor of Subversion (software), an Open Source version control system. He continues to be involved with electronic music community events such as Chillits, and speaks often at open source conferences worldwide.

Abstract
The spread of Wikis and Open Source projects in the public sphere is well known - but the potential for dramatically improving how people work within the corporate world is just beginning to be tapped. Brian will focus specifically on Open Source development practices and tools being used inside of large multinationals, and the surprising benefits they bring.
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Discuss

Brian Behlendorf (Born March 30, 1973) is an technologist, computer programmer, and an important figure in the open-source software movement. He was a primary developer of the Apache Web server, the most popular web server software on the Internet, and a founding member of the Apache Group, which later became the Apache Software Foundation. Behlendorf served as President of the Foundation for three years. Behlendorf, raised in Southern California, became interested in the early development of the Internet while he was a student at the University of California, Berkeley in the early 1990s. One of his first projects was an electronic mailing list and online music resource, SFRaves, which a friend persuaded him to start in 1992. Behlendorf was an early participant and the chief technology guru for the Burning Man festival, and also founded Hyperreal, a large online resource devoted to electronic music and related subcultures. In 1993, Behlendorf, Jonathan Nelson, Matthew Nelson and Cliff Skolnick co-founded Organic, Inc., the first business dedicated to building commercial web sites. While developing the first online, for-profit, media project — the HotWired web site for Wired Magazine — in 1994, they realized that the most commonly used web server software at the time (developed at the National Center for Supercomputing Applications at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign) could not handle the user registration system that the company required. So, Behlendorf patched the open-source code to support HotWired's requirements.

It turned out that Behlendorf wasn't the only one busy patching the NCSA code at the time, so he and Cliff Skolnick put together an electronic mailing list to coordinate the work of the other programmers. By the end of February 1995, eight core contributors to the project started Apache as a "fork" of the NCSA codebase. Working loosely together, they eventually rewrote the entire original program as the Apache HTTP Server. In 1999, the project incorporated as the Apache Software Foundation. Behlendorf is now the Chief Technology Officer at CollabNet, a company he co-founded with O'Reilly & Associates (now O'Reilly Media) in 1999 to develop tools for enabling collaborative, distributed software development. CollabNet is also the primary corporate sponsor of Subversion (software), an Open Source version control system. He continues to be involved with electronic music community events such as Chillits, and speaks often at open source conferences worldwide.

Abstract The spread of Wikis and Open Source projects in the public sphere is well known - but the potential for dramatically improving how people work within the corporate world is just beginning to be tapped. Brian will focus specifically on Open Source development practices and tools being used inside of large multinationals, and the surprising benefits they bring.